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  • Infinities: Part 2, the Omnipresence of God.

    Infinities: Part 2, the Omnipresence of God.

    The changelessness of God manifests itself in all His Infinities. For instance, He is omnipresent. He is everywhere at once, and that will never change. That means I can never be away from His Presence. David was overwhelmed by this realization…

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  • Infinities: Part 1, the Changelessness of God.

    Infinities: Part 1, the Changelessness of God.

    A recurring thought in Kierkegaard’s writing is the idea of the changelessness of God; an idea expressed succinctly by the writer of the letter to the Hebrews when he says: Jesus Christ is the same yesterday and today, and forever. He is the same to you and to me and to every other person in the world. Therefore, in that relationship between Him and me, there is only one variable: I am the only changeable part of the equation. The consequences of that relationship depend entirely on me. This can be good news or bad news

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  • The Evensong, from Matthew’s gospel, Part 7: You can live in the Kingdom.

    The Evensong, from Matthew’s gospel, Part 7: You can live in the Kingdom.

    In this series I have been following Jesus’ last set of teachings to the crowds that gathered around Him… the last chance He would have to personally address them, to personally entreat them to enter the Kingdom. These lessons are now coming to an end. After these teaching sessions at the Temple, Jesus will concentrate on teaching His disciples the final set of lessons they would need to know before His mission was completed.

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  • The Evensong, from Matthew’s gospel: Part 6: You know.

    The Evensong, from Matthew’s gospel: Part 6: You know.

    There is an old joke about a man who went into a local pet store; and no sooner had he entered that this parrot spoke up: “Squawk… You are the ugliest thing I have ever seen.” The man, upset, turns to the owner, who shrugs his shoulders and says, “I am sure its previous owner taught it to say that.” Next week, when the man comes by again, again the parrot goes: “Squawk… You are the ugliest thing I have ever seen.” The man just glares at the bird. The next week, again. But this time the man leans over to the cage and whispers: “You say that to me again and I’m going to buy you and wring your neck.” The next week comes. The door opens; and it is the same man. And the parrot says: “Squawk… You know…”

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  • The Evensong, from Matthew’s gospel: Part 5: As you have believed…

    The Evensong, from Matthew’s gospel: Part 5: As you have believed…

    Last time, we talked about the two blind men that Jesus healed at Jericho, on His way to Jerusalem, near the end of His ministry. But earlier in His ministry, Jesus had had another encounter with two blind men: Matthew 9:27-29 And as Jesus passed on thence, two blind [men] followed him, crying and saying, Have mercy on us, Son of David. And when he was come to the house, the blind [men] came to him. And Jesus says to them, Do ye believe that I am able to do this? They say to him, Yea, Lord. Then he touched their eyes, saying, According to your faith, be it unto you. Jesus’ question and His final response have always given me pause.

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  • What happened in between the verses?

    What happened in between the verses?

    This is a parenthesis motivated by the story of the blindmen healed at Jericho, from Part 4 of my ongoing series. It is also motivated by a very good book by Theologian Michael F. Bird, “Seven Things I Wish Christians Knew about the Bible.” His chapter on the Divine Inspiration of the Bible and its Infallibility (Reliability) covers those subjects very well. However, in the section where he addresses “difficult passages” – like apparent contradictions between different Gospels – Bird’s preferred explanation is that the individual Gospel writers, though inspired by the Holy Spirit, were free not only to use their own literary “voice” but also given “artistic license” in the arrangement of the narrative.

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